Estimating the impact of Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) on buffalo population dynamics in southern Philippines using data from cross-sectional surveys

Dargantes, A. P., Mercado, R. T., Dobson, R. J. and Reid, S. A. (2009) Estimating the impact of Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) on buffalo population dynamics in southern Philippines using data from cross-sectional surveys. International Journal for Parasitology, 39 10: 1109-1114. doi:10.1016/j.ijpara.2009.02.012


Author Dargantes, A. P.
Mercado, R. T.
Dobson, R. J.
Reid, S. A.
Title Estimating the impact of Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) on buffalo population dynamics in southern Philippines using data from cross-sectional surveys
Formatted title
Estimating the impact of Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) on buffalo population dynamics in southern Philippines using data from cross-sectional surveys 
Journal name International Journal for Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7519
1879-0135
Publication date 2009-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpara.2009.02.012
Volume 39
Issue 10
Start page 1109
End page 1114
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Despite the widespread problem with surra (Trypanosoma evansi) in livestock, there are no published studies on its impact on host populations, probably because of the large financial and time cost involved in performing longitudinal studies. During 2002-6, a cross-sectional survey for T. evansi infection involving 1732 buffaloes from 71 villages in southern Philippines was carried out. Other livestock animals (horses, cattle and goats) in every surveyed village were also tested for infection with T. evansi but domestic buffaloes were the primary survey target. Seroprevalence ranged from 6% to 21% and 13% to 100% for buffaloes in low and high risk areas, respectively. Key demographic parameters were estimated from the age structured distributions of the sampled buffalo population for each sex. All areas were dominated by females (69%) and the annual calving rate for areas of 100% and low seroprevalence was 15% and 47%, respectively. Males were removed at a relatively high annual rate of 27% in all areas. In the main reproductive years (4-10) female removal/mortality was <1% and 10% for low and high risk areas, respectively. Older females were removed/died at a rate similar to males regardless of area. In high risk areas there were consistently more 2-year than 1-year old females and the reverse was true for the low risk areas. This implies that females were imported to the high risk areas for breeding. By assuming a stable age structure and similar size populations in each area, it was estimated that 28% of female calves need to be moved from low to high risk areas to maintain the observed age structure. In high risk areas, surra imposes significant financial losses due to reduced fertility, high mortality/removal rate and the necessity to import replacement buffaloes.
Keyword Cattle
Horses
Host fertility
Host population demographics
Philippines
Seroprevalence
Swamp buffaloes
Trypanosoma evansi
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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