Survival of Trichinella papuae muscle larvae in a pig carcass maintained under simulated natural conditions in Papua New Guinea

Owen, Ifor L. and Reid, Simon A. (2007) Survival of Trichinella papuae muscle larvae in a pig carcass maintained under simulated natural conditions in Papua New Guinea. Journal of Helminthology, 81 4: 429-432. doi:10.1017/S0022149X07850255


Author Owen, Ifor L.
Reid, Simon A.
Title Survival of Trichinella papuae muscle larvae in a pig carcass maintained under simulated natural conditions in Papua New Guinea
Formatted title
Survival of Trichinella papuae muscle larvae in a pig carcass maintained under simulated natural conditions in Papua New Guinea
Journal name Journal of Helminthology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-149X
1475-2697
Publication date 2007-12-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0022149X07850255
Volume 81
Issue 4
Start page 429
End page 432
Total pages 4
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In Papua New Guinea, Trichinella papuae, a non-encapsulated species, is circulating among wild and domestic pigs and saltwater crocodiles. Since an important phase of the life cycle of nematodes of the genus Trichinella is the time of survival of infective larvae in decaying muscle tissues of the hosts, the carcass of a pig, experimentally infected with larvae of T. papuae, was exposed to the environmental conditions of Papua New Guinea to establish how long these larvae would survive and remain infective to a new host. Larvae retained their infectivity in the pig carcass up to 9 days after slaughtering, during which time the temperature within the carcass reached 35.0°C on 2 days; the average relative humidity was 79.0%. A low number of larvae survived up to day 14 after the pig was killed, when the carcass temperature reached 38.0°C, but they lost their infectivity to laboratory mice. This result suggests that the larvae of T. papuae can survive in a tropical environment for a time, favouring their transmission to a new host in spite of the lack of a collagen capsule.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 20 May 2014, 20:55:33 EST by System User on behalf of School of Public Health