Setting culture apart: distinguishing culture from behavior and social structure in safety and injury research

Myers, Douglas J., Nyce, James M. and Dekker, Sidney W.A. (2014) Setting culture apart: distinguishing culture from behavior and social structure in safety and injury research. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 68 25-29. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2013.12.010


Author Myers, Douglas J.
Nyce, James M.
Dekker, Sidney W.A.
Title Setting culture apart: distinguishing culture from behavior and social structure in safety and injury research
Journal name Accident Analysis and Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4575
1879-2057
Publication date 2014-07-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2013.12.010
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 68
Start page 25
End page 29
Total pages 5
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract The concept of culture is now widely used by those who conduct research on safety and work-related injury outcomes. We argue that as the term has been applied by an increasingly diverse set of disciplines, its scope has broadened beyond how it was defined and intended for use by sociologists and anthropologists. As a result, this more inclusive concept has lost some of its precision and analytic power. We suggest that the utility of this "new" understanding of culture could be improved if researchers more clearly delineated the ideological - the socially constructed abstract systems of meaning, norms, beliefs and values (which we refer to as culture) - from concrete behaviors, social relations and other properties of workplaces (e.g., organizational structures) and of society itself. This may help researchers investigate how culture and social structures can affect safety and injury outcomes with increased analytic rigor. In addition, maintaining an analytical distinction between culture and other social factors can help intervention efforts better understand the target of the intervention and therefore may improve chances of both scientific and instrumental success.
Keyword Culture
Hierarchy
Causation
Sociology
Anthropology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 19 December 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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