Comprehensive Behavioural Analysis of Long Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats Reveals Differential Effects of Housing Conditions on Tests Relevant to Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Turner, Karly M. and Burne, Thomas H. J. (2014) Comprehensive Behavioural Analysis of Long Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats Reveals Differential Effects of Housing Conditions on Tests Relevant to Neuropsychiatric Disorders. PLoS One, 9 3: e93411.1-e93411.10. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093411


Author Turner, Karly M.
Burne, Thomas H. J.
Title Comprehensive Behavioural Analysis of Long Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats Reveals Differential Effects of Housing Conditions on Tests Relevant to Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-03-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0093411
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page e93411.1
End page e93411.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Abstract Genetic (G) and environmental (E) manipulations are known to alter behavioural outcomes in rodents, however many animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders only use a restricted selection of strain and housing conditions. The aim of this study was to examine GxE interactions comparing two outbred rat strains, which were housed in either standard or enriched cages. The strains selected were the albino Sprague-Dawley rat, commonly used for animal models, and the other was the pigmented Long Evans rat, which is frequently used in cognitive studies. Rats were assessed using a comprehensive behavioural test battery and included well-established tests frequently employed to examine animal models of neuropsychiatric diseases, measuring aspects of anxiety, exploration, sensorimotor gating and cognition. Selective strain and housing effects were observed on a number of tests. These included increased locomotion and reduced pre-pulse inhibition in Long Evans rats compared to Sprague Dawley rats; and rats housed in enriched cages had reduced anxiety-like behaviour compared to standard housed rats. Long Evans rats required fewer sessions than Sprague Dawley rats to learn operant tasks, including a signal detection task and reversal learning. Furthermore, Long Evans rats housed in enriched cages acquired simple operant tasks faster than standard housed Long Evans rats. Cognitive phenotypes in animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders would benefit from using strain and housing conditions where there is greater potential for both enhancement and deficits in performance.
Keyword Gene Environment Interactions
Vitamin D deficiency
Elevated Plus Maze
Mouse Models
Prepulse Inhibition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 511066
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 18 May 2014, 10:16:34 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute