Loss of a kidney during fetal life: long-term consequences and lessons learned

Lankadeva, Yugeesh R., Singh, Reetu R., Tare, Marianne, Moritz, Karen M. and Denton, Kate M. (2014) Loss of a kidney during fetal life: long-term consequences and lessons learned. American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology, 306 8: F791-F800. doi:10.1152/ajprenal.00666.2013


Author Lankadeva, Yugeesh R.
Singh, Reetu R.
Tare, Marianne
Moritz, Karen M.
Denton, Kate M.
Title Loss of a kidney during fetal life: long-term consequences and lessons learned
Journal name American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1931-857X
1522-1466
Publication date 2014-04-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1152/ajprenal.00666.2013
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 306
Issue 8
Start page F791
End page F800
Total pages 10
Place of publication Bethesda, MD United States
Publisher American Physiological Society
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 Epidemiological studies reveal that children born with a solitary functioning kidney (SFK) have a greater predisposition to develop renal insufficiency and hypertension in early adulthood. A congenital SFK is present in patients with unilateral renal agenesis or unilateral multicystic kidney dysplasia, leading to both structural and functional adaptations in the remaining kidney, which act to mitigate the reductions in glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion that would otherwise ensue. To understand the mechanisms underlying the early development of renal insufficiency in children born with a SFK, we established a model of fetal uninephrectomy (uni-x) in sheep, a species that similar to humans complete nephrogenesis before birth. This model results in a 30% reduction in nephron number rather than 50%, due to compensatory nephrogenesis in the remaining kidney. Similar to children with a congenital SFK, uni-x sheep demonstrate a progressive increase in arterial pressure and a loss of renal function with aging. This review summarizes the compensatory changes in renal hemodynamics and tubular sodium handling that drive impairments in renal function and highlights the existence of sex differences in the functional adaptations following the loss of a kidney during fetal life.
Keyword Hypertension
Renin angiotensin system
Vasopressin
Nitric oxide
Aging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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