Contemporary rates of carbon sequestration through vertical accretion of sediments in mangrove forests and saltmarshes of South East Queensland, Australia

Lovelock, Catherine E., Adame, Maria Fernanda, Bennion, Vicki, Hayes, Matthew, O’Mara, Julian, Reef, Ruth and Santini, Nadia S. (2014) Contemporary rates of carbon sequestration through vertical accretion of sediments in mangrove forests and saltmarshes of South East Queensland, Australia. Estuaries and Coasts, 37 3: 763-771. doi:10.1007/s12237-013-9702-4


Author Lovelock, Catherine E.
Adame, Maria Fernanda
Bennion, Vicki
Hayes, Matthew
O’Mara, Julian
Reef, Ruth
Santini, Nadia S.
Title Contemporary rates of carbon sequestration through vertical accretion of sediments in mangrove forests and saltmarshes of South East Queensland, Australia
Journal name Estuaries and Coasts   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1559-2723
1559-2731
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12237-013-9702-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 3
Start page 763
End page 771
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract Mangrove forests and saltmarshes are important habitats for carbon (C) sequestration in the coastal zone but variation in rates of C sequestration and the factors controlling sequestration are poorly understood. We assessed C sequestration in Moreton Bay, South East Queensland in mangrove forests and tidal marshes that span a range of environmental settings and plant communities, including mangrove forests and tidal marshes on the oligotrophic sand islands of the eastern side of Moreton Bay and on the nutrient enriched, western side of the bay adjacent to the city of Brisbane. We found that rates of C sequestration in sediments were similar among mangrove forests over the bay, despite large differences in the C density of sediments, because of different rates of vertical accretion of sediments. The C sequestration on the oligotrophic sand island tidal marshes, dominated by Juncus kraussii, had the highest rate of C sequestration in the bay while the western saltmarshes, which were dominated by Sarcocornia quinqueflora, had the lowest rate of C sequestration. Our data indicate C sequestration varies among different tidal wetland plant community types, due to variation in sediment characteristics and rates of sediment accretion over time.
Formatted abstract
Mangrove forests and saltmarshes are important habitats for carbon (C) sequestration in the coastal zone but variation in rates of C sequestration and the factors controlling sequestration are poorly understood. We assessed C sequestration in Moreton Bay, South East Queensland in mangrove forests and tidal marshes that span a range of environmental settings and plant communities, including mangrove forests and tidal marshes on the oligotrophic sand islands of the eastern side of Moreton Bay and on the nutrient enriched, western side of the bay adjacent to the city of Brisbane. We found that rates of C sequestration in sediments were similar among mangrove forests over the bay, despite large differences in the C density of sediments, because of different rates of vertical accretion of sediments. The C sequestration on the oligotrophic sand island tidal marshes, dominated by Juncus kraussii, had the highest rate of C sequestration in the bay while the western saltmarshes, which were dominated by Sarcocornia quinqueflora, had the lowest rate of C sequestration. Our data indicate C sequestration varies among different tidal wetland plant community types, due to variation in sediment characteristics and rates of sediment accretion over time.
Keyword Avicennia marina
Rod surface elevation tables
Sediment nutrients
Carbon/phosphorus ratio
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 16 May 2014, 03:51:52 EST by Professor Catherine Lovelock on behalf of School of Biological Sciences