Investigating invariant item ordering in the Mental Health Inventory: an illustration of the use of different methods

Watson, Roger, Wang, Wenru, Thompson, David R. and Meijer, Rob R. (2014) Investigating invariant item ordering in the Mental Health Inventory: an illustration of the use of different methods. Personality And Individual Differences, 66 74-78. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2014.03.017

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Author Watson, Roger
Wang, Wenru
Thompson, David R.
Meijer, Rob R.
Title Investigating invariant item ordering in the Mental Health Inventory: an illustration of the use of different methods
Journal name Personality And Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2014-08-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2014.03.017
Volume 66
Start page 74
End page 78
Total pages 5
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Abstract Invariant item ordering is a property of scales whereby the items are scored in the same order across a wide range of the latent trait and across a wide range of respondents. In the package ‘mokken’ in the statistical software R, the ability to analyse Mokken scales for invariant item ordering has recently been available and techniques for inspecting visually the item response curves of item pairs, have also been included. While methods to assess invariant item ordering are available, there have been indications that items representing extremes of distress in mental well-being scales, such as suicidal ideation, may lead to claiming invariant item ordering where it does not exist. We used the Mental Health Inventory to see if invariant item ordering was indicated in any Mokken scales derived and to see if this was being influenced by extreme items. A Mokken scale was derived indicating invariant item ordering. Visual inspection of the item pairs indicated that the most difficult item (suicidal ideation) was located far from the remaining cluster of items. Removing this item lowered invariant item ordering to an unacceptable level.
Keyword Item response theory
Mokken scaling
Invariant item ordering
Mental health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 12 May 2014, 21:24:04 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work