The multisensory perception of co-speech gestures: a review and meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies

Marstaller, Lars and Burianová, Hana (2014) The multisensory perception of co-speech gestures: a review and meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 30 1: 69-77. doi:10.1016/j.jneuroling.2014.04.003


Author Marstaller, Lars
Burianová, Hana
Title The multisensory perception of co-speech gestures: a review and meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies
Journal name Journal of Neurolinguistics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0911-6044
1873-8052
Publication date 2014-07-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jneuroling.2014.04.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 77
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject 3310 Linguistics and Language
2805 Cognitive Neuroscience
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
1201 Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
Abstract Co-speech gestures constitute a unique form of multimodal communication because here the hand movements are temporally synchronized and semantically integrated with speech. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that the perception of co-speech gestures might engage a core set of frontal, temporal, and parietal areas. However, no study has compared the neural processes during perception of different types of co-speech gestures, such as beat, deictic, iconic, and metaphoric co-speech gestures. The purpose of this study was to review the existing literature on the neural correlates of co-speech gesture perception and to test whether different types of co-speech gestures elicit a common pattern of brain activity in the listener. To this purpose, we conducted a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies, which used different types of co-speech gestures to investigate the perception of multimodal (co-speech gestures) in contrast to unimodal (speech or gestures) stimuli. The results show that co-speech gesture perception consistently engages temporal regions related to auditory and movement perception as well as frontal-parietal regions associated with action understanding. The results of this study suggest that brain regions involved in multisensory processing and action understanding constitute the general core of co-speech gesture perception.
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• We investigate neural correlates of co-speech gesture perception.
• We focus on the neural overlap between different gesture types.
• We find two core systems for multisensory perception and action understanding.

Co-speech gestures constitute a unique form of multimodal communication because here the hand movements are temporally synchronized and semantically integrated with speech. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that the perception of co-speech gestures might engage a core set of frontal, temporal, and parietal areas. However, no study has compared the neural processes during perception of different types of co-speech gestures, such as beat, deictic, iconic, and metaphoric co-speech gestures. The purpose of this study was to review the existing literature on the neural correlates of co-speech gesture perception and to test whether different types of co-speech gestures elicit a common pattern of brain activity in the listener. To this purpose, we conducted a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies, which used different types of co-speech gestures to investigate the perception of multimodal (co-speech gestures) in contrast to unimodal (speech or gestures) stimuli. The results show that co-speech gesture perception consistently engages temporal regions related to auditory and movement perception as well as frontal-parietal regions associated with action understanding. The results of this study suggest that brain regions involved in multisensory processing and action understanding constitute the general core of co-speech gesture perception.
Keyword Co-speech gestures
Multisensory perception
Meta-analysis
Action understanding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 12 May 2014, 10:58:01 EST by Lars Marstaller on behalf of Centre for Advanced Imaging