Placental vascular defects in compromised pregnancies: effects of assisted reproductive technologies and other maternal stressors

Reynolds, Lawrence P., Borowicz, Pawel P., Palmieri, Chiara and Grazul-Bilska, Anna T. (2014). Placental vascular defects in compromised pregnancies: effects of assisted reproductive technologies and other maternal stressors. In: Lubo Zhang and Charles A. Ducsay, Advances in Fetal and Neonatal Physiology: Proceedings of the Center for Perinatal Biology 40th Anniversary Symposium. Center for Perinatal Biology 40th Anniversary Symposium, Loma Linda, CA, United States, (193-204). 11 February 2013. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1031-1_17


Author Reynolds, Lawrence P.
Borowicz, Pawel P.
Palmieri, Chiara
Grazul-Bilska, Anna T.
Title of paper Placental vascular defects in compromised pregnancies: effects of assisted reproductive technologies and other maternal stressors
Conference name Center for Perinatal Biology 40th Anniversary Symposium
Conference location Loma Linda, CA, United States
Conference dates 11 February 2013
Proceedings title Advances in Fetal and Neonatal Physiology: Proceedings of the Center for Perinatal Biology 40th Anniversary Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Place of Publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4939-1031-1_17
ISBN 9781493910304
9781493910311
ISSN 0065-2598
Editor Lubo Zhang
Charles A. Ducsay
Volume 814
Start page 193
End page 204
Total pages 12
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Many factors negatively affect pregnancy establishment and subsequent fetal growth and development, including maternal factors such as nutritional stress, age, body mass index, and genetic background, and external factors including environmental stress, psychosocial stress, multiple fetuses, medical conditions (e.g., polycystic ovary syndrome), lifestyle choices (e.g., alcohol consumption, smoking), and assisted reproductive technologies. These same factors have similar consequences for placental growth and development, including vascular development. We and others have shown that placental vascular development begins very early in pregnancy and determines, to a large extent, placental function—that is, the magnitude of the increase in placental blood flow and thus nutrient transport to the fetus. During the peri-implantation period and also later in pregnancy, cloned (somatic cell nuclear transfer) embryos exhibit a variety of placental defects including reduced vascularization and altered expression of angiogenic factors. Although placental defects are less pronounced in pregnancies resulting from the transfer of in vitro fertilized embryos, we and others have recently demonstrated that vascularization, expression of angiogenic factors, sex steroid receptors, several epigenetic markers, and growth of utero-placental tissues all were altered during early pregnancy after transfer of embryos obtained through natural mating, in vitro fertilization, or other assisted reproductive techniques. These observations are in agreement with the recent reports that in humans even singleton pregnancies established with assisted reproductive techniques are at increased risk of preterm delivery and low birth weight, and seem especially relevant considering the rapidly expanding use of these techniques in humans and animals.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 08 May 2014, 03:28:53 EST by Chiara Palmieri on behalf of School of Veterinary Science