Nine year changes in sitting time in young and mid-aged Australian women: Findings from the Australian longitudinal study for women's health

Clark, B. K., Peeters, G. M. E. E., Gomersall, S. R., Pavey, T. G. and Brown, W. J. (2014) Nine year changes in sitting time in young and mid-aged Australian women: Findings from the Australian longitudinal study for women's health. Preventive Medicine, 64 1-7. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.03.017

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Author Clark, B. K.
Peeters, G. M. E. E.
Gomersall, S. R.
Pavey, T. G.
Brown, W. J.
Title Nine year changes in sitting time in young and mid-aged Australian women: Findings from the Australian longitudinal study for women's health
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 2014-07-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.03.017
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 64
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Objective: To examine changes in sitting time (ST) in women over nine years and to identify associations between life events and these changes. Methods: Young (born 1973-78, n. = 5215) and mid-aged (born 1946-51, n. = 6973) women reported life events and ST in four surveys of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health between 2000 and 2010. Associations between life events and changes in ST between surveys (decreasers ≥. 2. h/day less, increasers ≥. 2. h/day more) were estimated using generalized estimating equations. Results: Against a background of complex changes there was an overall decrease in ST in young women (median change - 0.48. h/day, interquartile range [IQR]. = - 2.54, 1.50) and an increase in ST in mid-aged women (median change 0.43. h/day; IQR. = - 1.29, 2.0) over nine years. In young women, returning to study and job loss were associated with increased ST, while having a baby, beginning work and decreased income were associated with decreased ST. In mid-aged women, changes at work were associated with increased ST, while retiring and decreased income were associated with decreased ST. Conclusions: ST changed over nine years in young and mid-aged Australian women. The life events they experienced, particularly events related to work and family, were associated with these changes.
Keyword Life events
Longitudinal study
Sitting
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 569940
APP1000986
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 20 March 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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