Role of stressful and traumatic life events in obsessive–compulsive disorder

Fontenelle, Leonardo F., Cocchi, Luca, Harrison, Ben J., Miguel, Euripedes and Torres, Albina R. (2011) Role of stressful and traumatic life events in obsessive–compulsive disorder. Neuropsychiatry, 1 1: 61-69. doi:10.2217/NPY.10.1


Author Fontenelle, Leonardo F.
Cocchi, Luca
Harrison, Ben J.
Miguel, Euripedes
Torres, Albina R.
Title Role of stressful and traumatic life events in obsessive–compulsive disorder
Journal name Neuropsychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-2008
1758-2016
Publication date 2011-02-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.2217/NPY.10.1
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 61
End page 69
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Future Medicine
Language eng
Abstract Whilst genetic factors are thought to contribute to the development of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), the role of environmental factors in OCD is only beginning to be understood. In this article, we review the influence of stress-related factors in OCD. Overall, studies indicate that: patients with OCD frequently report stressful and traumatic life events before illness onset, although these rates do not seem to be significantly different from those described in other disorders; the association between OCD and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) might result from symptom overlap, although cases of patients developing OCD after PTSD and showing obsessive–compulsive symptoms that were unrelated to trauma have been described fairly consistently; it is unclear whether patients with OCD and a history of stress-related factors (including stressful life events, traumatic life events or comorbid PTSD) may respond better or worse to the available treatments; and comorbid PTSD may modify the clinical expression of OCD – although controlled studies comparing pre- versus post-traumatic OCD patients are still unavailable. In conclusion, there is a growing evidence to suggest a role for stress-related factors in OCD. Although the available literature does not confirm the existence of a post-traumatic subtype of OCD, it does call for further systematic research into this topic.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 03 May 2014, 19:26:28 EST by Luca Cocchi on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute