Biogeographic and evolutionary implications of an extinct late Pleistocene Impala from the Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya

Faith, J. Tyler, Tryon, Christian A., Peppe, Daniel J., Beverly, Emily J. and Blegen, Nick (2014) Biogeographic and evolutionary implications of an extinct late Pleistocene Impala from the Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, 21 2: 213-222. doi:10.1007/s10914-013-9238-1


Author Faith, J. Tyler
Tryon, Christian A.
Peppe, Daniel J.
Beverly, Emily J.
Blegen, Nick
Title Biogeographic and evolutionary implications of an extinct late Pleistocene Impala from the Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya
Journal name Journal of Mammalian Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-7554
1573-7055
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10914-013-9238-1
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 213
End page 222
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study contributes to the growing complexity of the impala fossil record through a morphological description and analysis of Aepyceros fossils from late Pleistocene deposits in Kenya's Lake Victoria Basin. We show that the Lake Victoria impala belongs to an extinct species that differs from modern impala and its fossil predecessors by a combination of exceptionally deep mandibles and teeth characterized by greater hypsodonty and occlusal lengths. Whereas modern impala (A. melampus) displays substantial ecological flexibility, these traits in the extinct species suggest a more dedicated adaptation to grazing in open and dry environments. Previous phylogeographic observations indicate that A. melampus was extirpated from East Africa, perhaps during the middle-to-late Pleistocene, and later recolonized from southern Africa. The Lake Victoria impala raises the possibility that the evidence interpreted as extirpation may instead reflect speciation, with A. melampus giving rise to a novel East African species while persisting unchanged in southern Africa. Increased rainfall and rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations at the end of the Pleistocene may have played a role in the disappearance of the extinct form via habitat loss and possibly competition with the more versatile A. melampus.
Keyword Aepyceros
Aridity
Extirpation
Hypsodonty
Karungu
Rusinga Island
Quaternary extinctions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Author post-print permissible

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 28 Apr 2014, 19:26:41 EST by Tyler Faith on behalf of School of Social Science