The Impact of Diabetes on the Labour Force Participation and Income Poverty of Workers Aged 45-64 Years in Australia

Schofield, Deborah J., Cunich, Michelle, Shrestha, Rupendra N., Callander, Emily J., Passey, Megan E., Kelly, Simon J., Tanton, Robert and Veerman, Lennert (2014) The Impact of Diabetes on the Labour Force Participation and Income Poverty of Workers Aged 45-64 Years in Australia. PLoS One, 9 2: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089360


Author Schofield, Deborah J.
Cunich, Michelle
Shrestha, Rupendra N.
Callander, Emily J.
Passey, Megan E.
Kelly, Simon J.
Tanton, Robert
Veerman, Lennert
Title The Impact of Diabetes on the Labour Force Participation and Income Poverty of Workers Aged 45-64 Years in Australia
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0089360
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 2
Total pages 7
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Abstract Background
Formatted abstract
Objective: To quantify the poverty status and level of disadvantage experienced by Australians aged 45–64 years who have
left the labour force due to diabetes in 2010.

Research Design and Methods: A purpose-built microsimulation model, Health&WealthMOD2030, was used to estimate
the poverty status and level of disadvantage of those aged 45–64 years who prematurely retire from the workforce due to
diabetes. A multiple regression model was used to identify significant differences in rates of income poverty and the degree
of disadvantage between those out of the labour force due to diabetes and those employed full- or part-time with no
diabetes.

Results: 63.9% of people aged 45–64 years who were out of the labour force due to diabetes were in poverty in 2010. The
odds of being in poverty for those with no diabetes and employed full-time (OR of being in poverty 0.02 95%CI: 0.01–0.04)
or part-time (OR of being in poverty 0.10 95%CI: 0.05–0.23) are significantly lower than those for persons not in the labour
force due to diabetes. Amongst those with diabetes, those who were able to stay in either full- or part-time employment
were as much as 97% less likely to be in poverty than those who had to retire early because of the condition. Sensitivity
analysis was used to assess impacts of different poverty line thresholds and key socioeconomic predictors of poverty.

Conclusions: This study has shown that having diabetes and not being in the labour force because of this condition
significantly increases the chances of living in poverty. Intervening to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes is likely to
improve their living standards. 
Keyword Impaired Glucose Tolerance
Life Style
Financial Barriers
Mellitus
Productivity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID LP100100158
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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