Southern Ocean Islands invaded: conserving biodiversity in the world’s last wilderness

Shaw, Justine D. (2013). Southern Ocean Islands invaded: conserving biodiversity in the world’s last wilderness. In Llewellyn C. Foxcrof, Petr Pysek, David M. Richardson and Piero Genovesi (Ed.), Plant invasions in protected areas: patterns, problems and challenges (pp. 449-470) Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-94-007-7750-7_20

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Author Shaw, Justine D.
Title of chapter Southern Ocean Islands invaded: conserving biodiversity in the world’s last wilderness
Title of book Plant invasions in protected areas: patterns, problems and challenges
Place of Publication Dordrecht, The Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-7750-7_20
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Series Invading Nature - Springer Series in Invasion Ecology
ISBN 9789400777491
9789400777507
ISSN 1874-7809
Editor Llewellyn C. Foxcrof
Petr Pysek
David M. Richardson
Piero Genovesi
Volume number 7
Chapter number 20
Start page 449
End page 470
Total pages 22
Total chapters 28
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The Southern Ocean islands are some of the most isolated landmasses in the world. Few of the islands support permanent human settlements or land based industries and as such they remain as some of the most uninvaded landscapes globally. Over 250 non-native plants are currently established across the region. Most are grasses and small herbs, and as such have similar growth forms to the native vegetation. Many of the invasive plants present today arrived several hundred years ago with whaling and sealing gangs, others have been introduced more recently with cargo and building programmes associated with research stations. The Southern Ocean Islands provide a unique opportunity to study and manage invasive plants as the islands have low propagule pressure and very few confounding factors that drive invasion processes elsewhere, such as herbivores, agriculture and land clearance. Invasive plants vary in abundance and distribution on islands and residence time has been shown to significantly influence their area of occupancy. The high protection status of the islands has led to numerous management actions and restoration programmes, some involving invasive plant eradication attempts. Rigorous biosecurity measures are essential to stem future introductions and ensure the island ecosystems remain intact.
Keyword Sub-Antarctic
Cool temperate
Eradication
Herbivores
Residence time
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
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Created: Wed, 23 Apr 2014, 23:29:29 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of School of Biological Sciences