Testing the role of circadian genes in conferring risk for psychiatric disorders

Byrne, Enda M., Heath, Andrew C., Madden, Pamela A. F., Pergadia, Michele L., Hickie, Ian B., Montgomery, Grant W., Martin, Nicholas G. and Wray, Naomi R. (2014) Testing the role of circadian genes in conferring risk for psychiatric disorders. American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 165 3: 254-260. doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.32230

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Author Byrne, Enda M.
Heath, Andrew C.
Madden, Pamela A. F.
Pergadia, Michele L.
Hickie, Ian B.
Montgomery, Grant W.
Martin, Nicholas G.
Wray, Naomi R.
Title Testing the role of circadian genes in conferring risk for psychiatric disorders
Journal name American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1552-4841
1552-485X
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ajmg.b.32230
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 165
Issue 3
Start page 254
End page 260
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher John Wiley and Sons Inc
Language eng
Subject 2716 Genetics (clinical)
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
2804 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Abstract Disturbed sleep and disrupted circadian rhythms are a common feature of psychiatric disorders, and many groups have postulated an association between genetic variants in circadian clock genes and psychiatric disorders. Using summary data from the association analyses of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortia (PGC) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, we evaluated the evidence that common SNPs in genes encoding components of the molecular clock influence risk to psychiatric disorders. Initially, gene-based and SNP P-values were analyzed for 21 core circadian genes. Subsequently, an expanded list of genes linked to control of circadian rhythms was analyzed. After correcting for multiple comparisons, none of the circadian genes were significantly associated with any of the three disorders. Several genes previously implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders harbored no SNPs significant at the nominal level of P<0.05, and none of the the variants identified in candidate studies of clock genes that were included in the PGC datasets were significant after correction for multiple testing. There was no evidence of an enrichment of associations in genes linked to control of circadian rhythms in human cells. Our results suggest that genes encoding components of the molecular clock are not good candidates for harboring common variants that increase risk to bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or major depressive disorder.
Keyword Circadian
Clock
Mood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 613608
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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