Higher uptake of long-acting reversible and permanent methods of contraception by Australian women living in rural and remote areas

Lucke, Jayne C. and Herbert, Danielle L. (2014) Higher uptake of long-acting reversible and permanent methods of contraception by Australian women living in rural and remote areas. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 2: 112-116. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12208


Author Lucke, Jayne C.
Herbert, Danielle L.
Title Higher uptake of long-acting reversible and permanent methods of contraception by Australian women living in rural and remote areas
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1753-6405
1326-0200
Publication date 2014-04-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12208
Volume 38
Issue 2
Start page 112
End page 116
Total pages 5
Place of publication Richmond Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives:
To examine factors associated with the uptake of i) long-acting reversible, ii) permanent and iii) traditional contraceptive methods among Australian women.

Methods:
Participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health born in 1973-78 reported on their contraceptive use at three surveys: 2003, 2006 and 2009. The participants were 5,849 women aged 25-30 in 2003 randomly sampled from Medicare. The main outcome measure was current contraceptive method at age 28-33 years categorised as long-acting reversible methods (implant, IUD, injection), permanent (tubal ligation, vasectomy), and traditional methods (oral contraceptive pills, condoms, withdrawal, safe period).

Results:
Compared to women living in major cities, women in inner regional areas were more likely to use long-acting (OR=1.26, 95%CI 1.03-1.55) or permanent methods (OR=1.43, 95%CI 1.17-1.76). Women living in outer regional/remote areas were more likely than women living in cities to use long-acting (OR=1.65, 95%CI 1.31-2.08) or permanent methods (OR=1.69, 95%CI 1.43-2.14).

Conclusions:
Location of residence is an important factor in women's choices about long-acting and permanent contraception in addition to the number and age of their children. Implications: Further research is needed to understand the role of geographical location in women's access to contraceptive options in Australia.
Keyword Australia
Contraception
Methods
Residence
Women's health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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