No evidence of triclosan-resistant bacteria following long-term use of triclosan-containing toothpaste

Cullinan, M. P., Bird, P. S., Heng, N. C. K., West, M. J. and Seymour, G. J. (2014) No evidence of triclosan-resistant bacteria following long-term use of triclosan-containing toothpaste. Journal of Periodontal Research, 49 2: 220-225. doi:10.1111/jre.12098


Author Cullinan, M. P.
Bird, P. S.
Heng, N. C. K.
West, M. J.
Seymour, G. J.
Title No evidence of triclosan-resistant bacteria following long-term use of triclosan-containing toothpaste
Journal name Journal of Periodontal Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3484
1600-0765
Publication date 2014-04-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jre.12098
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 49
Issue 2
Start page 220
End page 225
Total pages 6
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background and Objective
There is a paucity of data in relation to the possible emergence of triclosan (TCS)-resistant bacteria following long-term exposure to TCS toothpaste. Therefore, this study investigated whether long-term continuous exposure to TCS in toothpaste selects for TCS-resistant bacteria within the oral biofilm.

Material and Methods
Dental plaque samples were collected from 40 individuals during year 5 of a randomised controlled trial. Participants had been randomly assigned to use TCS (3000 μg/mL TCS) (n = 18) or placebo toothpaste (n = 22). Diluted plaque samples were plated on to Wilkins–Chalgren agar plates containing 5% (v/v) laked sheep red blood cells and TCS (concentrations ranging from 25 to 150 μg/mL) and incubated at 37°C under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions for 2–10 d. Selected bacterial isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequencing and TCS minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined for each isolate.

Results
At 3000 μg/mL TCS no growth was observed under microaerophilic or anaerobic conditions in either group. The MICs of TCS for all isolates ranged from 125 to 1000 μg/mL in both groups. Species common to both groups had similar MICs. Veillonella parvula and Campylobacter gracilis were the most frequent isolates from both groups, with similar MICs in both groups.

Conclusion

The use of TCS-containing toothpaste did not appear to lead to an increase in MIC of TCS of oral bacterial isolates.
Keyword Antimicrobial resistance
Oral bacteria
Toothpaste
Triclosan
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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