A sequential sampling account of response bias and speed-accuracy tradeoffs in a conflict detection task

Vuckovic, Anita, Kwantes, Peter J., Humphreys, Michael and Neal, Andrew (2014) A sequential sampling account of response bias and speed-accuracy tradeoffs in a conflict detection task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 20 1: 55-68. doi:10.1037/xap000007


Author Vuckovic, Anita
Kwantes, Peter J.
Humphreys, Michael
Neal, Andrew
Title A sequential sampling account of response bias and speed-accuracy tradeoffs in a conflict detection task
Journal name Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1076-898X
1939-2192
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/xap000007
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 20
Issue 1
Start page 55
End page 68
Total pages 14
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract Signal Detection Theory (SDT; Green & Swets, 1966) is a popular tool for understanding decision making. However, it does not account for the time taken to make a decision, nor why response bias might change over time. Sequential sampling models provide a way of accounting for speed-accuracy trade-offs and response bias shifts. In this study, we test the validity of a sequential sampling model of conflict detection in a simulated air traffic control task by assessing whether two of its key parameters respond to experimental manipulations in a theoretically consistent way. Through experimental instructions, we manipulated participants' response bias and the relative speed or accuracy of their responses. The sequential sampling model was able to replicate the trends in the conflict responses as well as response time across all conditions. Consistent with our predictions, manipulating response bias was associated primarily with changes in the model's Criterion parameter, whereas manipulating speed- accuracy instructions was associated with changes in the Threshold parameter. The success of the model in replicating the human data suggests we can use the parameters of the model to gain an insight into the underlying response bias and speed-accuracy preferences common to dynamic decision-making tasks.
Keyword Criterion
Response bias
Sequential sampling model
Speed-accuracy
Threshold
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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