Suicidal and online: how do online behaviors inform us of this high-risk population?

Harris, Keith M., McLean, John P. and Sheffield, Jeanie (2014) Suicidal and online: how do online behaviors inform us of this high-risk population?. Death Studies, 38 6: 387-394. doi:10.1080/07481187.2013.768313


Author Harris, Keith M.
McLean, John P.
Sheffield, Jeanie
Title Suicidal and online: how do online behaviors inform us of this high-risk population?
Journal name Death Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1091-7683
0748-1187
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/07481187.2013.768313
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 6
Start page 387
End page 394
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, United States
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
3203 Clinical Psychology
1201 Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
Abstract To assist suicide prevention we need a better understanding of how suicidal individuals act in their environment, and the online world offers an ideal opportunity to examine daily behaviors. This anonymous survey (N = 1,016) provides first-of-its-kind empirical evidence demonstrating suicide-risk people (n = 290) are unique in their online behaviors. Suicidal users reported more time online, greater likelihood of developing online personal relationships, and greater use of online forums. In addition, suicide-risk women reported more time browsing/surfing and social networking. The authors conclude that suicide prevention efforts should respond to suicide-risk users' greater demands for online interpersonal communications.
Formatted abstract
To assist suicide prevention we need a better understanding of how suicidal individuals act in their environment, and the online world offers an ideal opportunity to examine daily behaviors. This anonymous survey (N = 1,016) provides first-of-its-kind empirical evidence demonstrating suicide-risk people (n = 290) are unique in their online behaviors. Suicidal users reported more time online, greater likelihood of developing online personal relationships, and greater use of online forums. In addition, suicide-risk women reported more time browsing/surfing and social networking. The authors conclude that suicide prevention efforts should respond to suicide-risk users' greater demands for online interpersonal communications.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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