Comparative susceptibility of mosquito populations in North Queensland, Australia to oral infection with dengue virus

Ye, Yixin H., Ng, Tat Siong, Frentiu, Francesca D., Walker, Thomas, van den Hurk, Andrew F., O'Neill, Scott L., Beebe, Nigel W. and McGraw, Elizabeth A. (2014) Comparative susceptibility of mosquito populations in North Queensland, Australia to oral infection with dengue virus. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 90 3: 422-430. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.13-0186


Author Ye, Yixin H.
Ng, Tat Siong
Frentiu, Francesca D.
Walker, Thomas
van den Hurk, Andrew F.
O'Neill, Scott L.
Beebe, Nigel W.
McGraw, Elizabeth A.
Title Comparative susceptibility of mosquito populations in North Queensland, Australia to oral infection with dengue virus
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2014-03-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0186
Volume 90
Issue 3
Start page 422
End page 430
Total pages 9
Place of publication Deerfield, IL, United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus, with at least 40% of the world's population at risk of infection each year. In Australia, dengue is not endemic, but viremic travelers trigger outbreaks involving hundreds of cases. We compared the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from two geographically isolated populations to two strains of dengue virus serotype 2. We found, interestingly, that mosquitoes from a city with no history of dengue were more susceptible to virus than mosquitoes from an outbreak-prone region, particularly with respect to one dengue strain. These findings suggest recent evolution of population-based differences in vector competence or different historical origins. Future genomic comparisons of these populations could reveal the genetic basis of vector competence and the relative role of selection and stochastic processes in shaping their differences. Lastly, we show the novel finding of a correlation between midgut dengue titer and titer in tissues colonized after dissemination.
Keyword Aedes aegypti
Vector ompetence
French Polynesia
Pcr Assay
Strains
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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