Repositioning electronic information systems in human service organisations

Gillingham, Philip (2014) Repositioning electronic information systems in human service organisations. Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership & Governance, 38 2: 125-134. doi:10.1080/03643107.2013.853011

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Author Gillingham, Philip
Title Repositioning electronic information systems in human service organisations
Journal name Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership & Governance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2330-3131
2330-314X
Publication date 2014-04-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/03643107.2013.853011
Volume 38
Issue 2
Start page 125
End page 134
Total pages 10
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The electronic information systems (IS) that have been implemented in human service organizations have been heavily criticized, in particular that they have undermined frontline service delivery. Attention has turned to how they might be better designed for the future but understanding why IS have not performed as intended remains important to avoid past mistakes. Drawing from research that aims to improve future designs of IS, the reasons why positioning IS as a panacea for organizations is problematic are explored in relation to the tasks IS can be realistically expected to support within a human services organization.
Keyword Electronic information systems
Human services organizations
Joint cognitive systems
Technology -- social aspects
Social work administration
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 12 Apr 2014, 00:05:00 EST by Philip Gillingham on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services