Patellofemoral pain: Consensus statement from the 3rd International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat held in Vancouver, September 2013

Witvrouw, Erik, Callaghan, Michael J, Stefanik, Joshua J, Noehren, Brian, Bazett-Jones, David M, Willson, John D, Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E, Davis, Irene S, Powers, Christopher M, McConnell, Jenny and Crossley, Kay M (2014) Patellofemoral pain: Consensus statement from the 3rd International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat held in Vancouver, September 2013. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 6: 411-414. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-093450


Author Witvrouw, Erik
Callaghan, Michael J
Stefanik, Joshua J
Noehren, Brian
Bazett-Jones, David M
Willson, John D
Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E
Davis, Irene S
Powers, Christopher M
McConnell, Jenny
Crossley, Kay M
Title Patellofemoral pain: Consensus statement from the 3rd International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat held in Vancouver, September 2013
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-0480
0306-3674
Publication date 2014-03-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093450
Volume 48
Issue 6
Start page 411
End page 414
Total pages 4
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is often seen in physically active individuals and may account for 25–40% of all knee problems seen in a sports injury clinic.1 ,2 Patellofemoral-related problems occur more frequently in women than in men.3 PFP is characterised by diffuse pain over the anterior aspect of the knee and aggravated by activities that increase patellofemoral joint (PFJ) compressive forces, such as squatting, ascending and descending stairs and prolonged sitting, as well as repetitive activities such as running. It, therefore, has a debilitating effect on sufferers’ daily lives by reducing their ability to perform sporting and work-related activities pain free. Dye has described PFP as an orthopaedic enigma, and it is one of the most challenging pathologies to manage.4 Alarmingly, a high number of individuals with PFP have recurrent or chronic pain.5 While physiotherapy interventions for PFP have proven effective compared with sham treatments, treatment results can be disappointing in a proportion of patients. This variability in treatment results may be due to the fact that the underlying factors that contribute to the development of PFP are not being addressed, or are not the same for all patients with PFP. The mission of the 3rd International Patellofemoral Research Retreat was to improve our understanding concerning the factors that contribute to the development and consequently to the treatment of PFP.
Keyword Sport Sciences
Sport Sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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