How musical engagement promotes well-being in education contexts: the case of a young man with profound and multiple disabilities

McFerran, Katrina S. and Shoemark, Helen (2013) How musical engagement promotes well-being in education contexts: the case of a young man with profound and multiple disabilities. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, 8 . doi:10.3402/qhw.v8i0.20570


Author McFerran, Katrina S.
Shoemark, Helen
Title How musical engagement promotes well-being in education contexts: the case of a young man with profound and multiple disabilities
Journal name International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1748-2623
1748-2631
Publication date 2013-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3402/qhw.v8i0.20570
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Total pages 14
Place of publication Jaerfaella, Sweden
Publisher Co-Action Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Students with profound intellectual disabilities disorders (IDDs) have the right to participate in educational opportunities that recognize their unique resources and needs, as do all children. Because of their specific communication challenges, positive relationships with attentive communication partners are critical for success. In fact, the power of positive relationships in schools is recognized to be connected to student well-being more broadly. This article examines the case of one young man with profound IDD and his relationship with his music therapist using a duo-ethnographic informed paradigmatic case study. Video analysis based on multi-voice perspectives is used to generate hermeneutic phenomenological findings to closely examine the relationship between a young man with profound IDD and a music therapist. The voices of four allied health researchers were also gathered to inform the authors’ construction of an informed commentary on the phenomenon. The results suggest that the essence lay in a combination of attentive, responsive and creative being with the other person over time. Four principles of musical engagement were identified in the video footage as critical to the meaningful relationships through music: the music therapist listens; the music therapist takes responsibility for structure; spontaneous initiation is sought from the young person; and the relationship is built over time. These concepts are contextualized within a discussion of student well-being that is underpinned by positive relationships and leads to students achieving their full potential within diverse school contexts.
Keyword Vulnerable students
Wellbeing
Intellectual disability disorder
Musical relationships
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Music Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 01 Apr 2014, 01:21:41 EST by Helen Shoemark on behalf of School of Music