Comparing trail runners and mountain bikers: motivation, involvement, portfolios, and event-tourist careers

Getz, Donald and McConnell, Aaron (2014) Comparing trail runners and mountain bikers: motivation, involvement, portfolios, and event-tourist careers. Journal of Convention and Event Tourism, 15 1: 69-100. doi:10.1080/15470148.2013.834807

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Author Getz, Donald
McConnell, Aaron
Title Comparing trail runners and mountain bikers: motivation, involvement, portfolios, and event-tourist careers
Journal name Journal of Convention and Event Tourism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1547-0148
1547-0156
Publication date 2014-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15470148.2013.834807
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 100
Total pages 32
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 1409 Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
Abstract Amateur trail runners and endurance mountain bikers are compared with regard to motivation, involvement in their sport, competitive-event portfolios, and event-travel careers. Participants in two destination events produced by a for-profit company constitute the sample frame, with the respondents having answered a sub-set of identical questions on an online, post-event evaluation survey. The two "destination events" differ considerably in terms of the gender of participants, with a much higher proportion of females in the running event. Both samples were revealed to have a fairly high level of involvement in their sport, but a large proportion of participants in both events also participated in a wider portfolio of challenging sports. Because the dominant motivation for both samples, and for both men and women, was personal challenge, it is concluded that for many respondents involvement is directed more toward physically demanding sport than toward a particular kind of sport or event. This involvement has led a majority to develop an event-travel career. Implications are drawn for sport-event management and event-tourism marketing. Recommendations are made for further research to explore the relevance of brand communities and consumption constellations in event tourism.
Formatted abstract
Amateur trail runners and endurance mountain bikers are compared with regard to motivation, involvement in their sport, competitive-event portfolios, and event-travel careers. Participants in two destination events produced by a for-profit company constitute the sample frame, with the respondents having answered a sub-set of identical questions on an online, post-event evaluation survey. The two “destination events” differ considerably in terms of the gender of participants, with a much higher proportion of females in the running event. Both samples were revealed to have a fairly high level of involvement in their sport, but a large proportion of participants in both events also participated in a wider portfolio of challenging sports. Because the dominant motivation for both samples, and for both men and women, was personal challenge, it is concluded that for many respondents involvement is directed more toward physically demanding sport than toward a particular kind of sport or event. This involvement has led a majority to develop an event-travel career. Implications are drawn for sport-event management and event-tourism marketing. Recommendations are made for further research to explore the relevance of brand communities and consumption constellations in event tourism.
Keyword Trail running
Mountain biking
Destination event
Involvement
Event portfolio
Event\-travel career
Constellation theory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 31 Mar 2014, 22:27:17 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School