Fruitspotting bugs, Amblypelta nitida Stål and A. lutescens lutescens Distant (Hemiptera: Coreidae): a review of the potential for integrated management practices

Danne, Alana W., Llewellyn, Richard, Huwer, Ruth K. and Furlong, Michael J. (2014) Fruitspotting bugs, Amblypelta nitida Stål and A. lutescens lutescens Distant (Hemiptera: Coreidae): a review of the potential for integrated management practices. Austral Entomology, 53 1: 112-123. doi:10.1111/aen.12059

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Author Danne, Alana W.
Llewellyn, Richard
Huwer, Ruth K.
Furlong, Michael J.
Title Fruitspotting bugs, Amblypelta nitida Stål and A. lutescens lutescens Distant (Hemiptera: Coreidae): a review of the potential for integrated management practices
Formatted title
 Fruitspotting bugs, Amblypelta nitida Stål and A. lutescens lutescens Distant (Hemiptera: Coreidae): a review of the potential for integrated management practices
Journal name Austral Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2052-174X
2052-1758
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/aen.12059
Volume 53
Issue 1
Start page 112
End page 123
Total pages 12
Place of publication Wiley-Blackwell
Publisher Richmond, VIC, Australia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 Fruitspotting bugs, Amblypelta nitida Stål, and A. lutescens lutescens Distant (Hemiptera: Coreidae), are polyphagous, native Australian pests of a wide range of tropical and subtropical fruit and nut crops. Both species occur predominantly along Australia's eastern coastline, A. nitida from c. 17°S-35°S and A. l. lutescens from c. 11°S-27°S, and as such, they are distributed across some of Australia's most important horticultural regions. Adults are cryptic and highly mobile, making population monitoring within affected tree crops difficult. Nymphs and adults inject salivary sucrase into plant tissue while feeding; this causes significant damage to fruiting structures and often renders them unsaleable. Despite their economic importance, many aspects of fruitspotting bug biology and ecology remain understudied; their chemical ecology, host-plant relationships, movements into, out of and within crops, and interactions with natural enemies are poorly understood. Currently, control of both species relies on applications of synthetic broad-spectrum insecticides, and the recent withdrawal of endosulfan has resulted in an increased use of more disruptive compounds. This paper reviews current knowledge of fruitspotting bug biology and ecology, and the strategies that are currently employed for control. Importantly, a synthetic lure based on some of the volatile compounds emitted by male A. l. lutescens has recently been developed and incorporated into a prototype trap. The device offers a promising new approach to population monitoring and the development of integrated management strategies for this species. Areas of research critical to the development of sustainable management strategies for fruitspotting bugs include: (1) host-plant relationships between fruitspotting bugs and their crop and non-crop host plants; (2) fruitspotting bug dispersal behaviour and movement patterns between and within crops, and between crops and non-crop vegetation; (3) methods for implementing biological control strategies; (4) utilising pheromone traps for monitoring and capture of fruitspotting bugs; and (5) screening of selective insecticides.
Keyword Biological control
Chemical ecology
Distribution
Feeding
IPM
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 22 October 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 29 Mar 2014, 01:49:19 EST by Michael Furlong on behalf of School of Biological Sciences