Parenting and prematurity: understanding parent experience and preferences for support

Whittingham, Koa, Boyd, Roslyn N., Sanders, Matthew R. and Colditz, Paul (2013) Parenting and prematurity: understanding parent experience and preferences for support. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23 6: 1050-1061. doi:10.1007/s10826-013-9762-x

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Author Whittingham, Koa
Boyd, Roslyn N.
Sanders, Matthew R.
Colditz, Paul
Title Parenting and prematurity: understanding parent experience and preferences for support
Journal name Journal of Child and Family Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1062-1024
1573-2843
Publication date 2013-05-24
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10826-013-9762-x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 23
Issue 6
Start page 1050
End page 1061
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Language eng
Abstract Infants born very preterm are at risk of developmental and behavioural problems and their parents are at risk of psychological distress and compromised parenting. This study has two key aims: (1) to identify, from the parents' own perspective, the unique aspects of parenting an infant born very preterm and (2) to assess parent preferences for support including opinions of a new, tailored parenting intervention, Prem Baby Positive Parenting Program (Triple P). A qualitative approach was taken with focus groups of 18 parents of infants born preterm and a thematic analysis conducted. Parents identified several unique aspects of parenting an infant born preterm including: difficulty coping with the stress of hospitalisation; institutionalisation to the hospital environment; a lack of preparation for the transition to parenthood; grief; isolation; getting into "bad parenting habits" of overnurturance and a lack of certainty about developmental expectations. Parents preferred parenting support that is tailored to parents of infants born preterm, has flexible delivery, enhances coping skills and the spousal relationship and is sensitive to the emotional context of parenting an infant born preterm. Understanding the experiences and the preferences of parents of infants born preterm is an important step in tailoring parenting interventions to fit their needs.
Formatted abstract
Infants born very preterm are at risk of developmental and behavioural problems and their parents are at risk of psychological distress and compromised parenting. This study has two key aims: (1) to identify, from the parents’ own perspective, the unique aspects of parenting an infant born very preterm and (2) to assess parent preferences for support including opinions of a new, tailored parenting intervention, Prem Baby Positive Parenting Program (Triple P). A qualitative approach was taken with focus groups of 18 parents of infants born preterm and a thematic analysis conducted. Parents identified several unique aspects of parenting an infant born preterm including: difficulty coping with the stress of hospitalisation; institutionalisation to the hospital environment; a lack of preparation for the transition to parenthood; grief; isolation; getting into “bad parenting habits” of overnurturance and a lack of certainty about developmental expectations. Parents preferred parenting support that is tailored to parents of infants born preterm, has flexible delivery, enhances coping skills and the spousal relationship and is sensitive to the emotional context of parenting an infant born preterm. Understanding the experiences and the preferences of parents of infants born preterm is an important step in tailoring parenting interventions to fit their needs.
Keyword Parenting intervention
Early intervention
Prematurity
Preterm
Infant
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 24 May 2013.

 
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Created: Wed, 26 Mar 2014, 03:11:10 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Medicine