Trajectories of adjustment to couple relationship separation

Halford, W. Kim and Sweeper, Susie (2013) Trajectories of adjustment to couple relationship separation. Family Process, 52 2: 228-243. doi:10.1111/famp.12006


Author Halford, W. Kim
Sweeper, Susie
Title Trajectories of adjustment to couple relationship separation
Journal name Family Process   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-7370
1545-5300
Publication date 2013-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/famp.12006
Volume 52
Issue 2
Start page 228
End page 243
Total pages 16
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract To test a stress-diathesis model of adjustment to separation, the current study describes the trajectories of different aspects of separation adjustment in people formerly married or cohabiting, and moderators of those trajectories. A convenience sample of 303 recently separated individuals (169 women; 134 men) completed assessments of their emotional attachment to the former partner, loneliness, psychological distress, and coparenting conflict at two time points 6 months apart. Multilevel modeling of the overlapping multicohort design was used to estimate the trajectories of these different aspects of adjustment as a function of time since separation, marital status, gender, presence of children from the relationship, who initiated separation, social support, and anxious attachment. Attachment to the former partner, loneliness, and psychological distress were initially high but improved markedly across the 2 years after separation, but coparenting conflict was high and stable. Adjustment problems were similar in men and women, and in those formerly married or cohabiting, except that reported coparenting conflict was higher in men than women. Low social support and high anxious attachment predicted persistent attachment to the former partner, loneliness, and psychological distress. Coparenting conflict is a common, chronic problem for many separated individuals, and individuals with certain psychological vulnerabilities also experience chronic personal distress.
Keyword Attachment anxiety
Cohabitation
Conflict
Coparenting
Divorce
Separation
Social support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 26 Mar 2014, 00:41:26 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology