Gestational weight gain in relation to offspring obesity over the life course: a systematic review and bias-adjusted meta-analysis

Mamun, A. A., Mannan, M and Doi, S. A. R. (2014) Gestational weight gain in relation to offspring obesity over the life course: a systematic review and bias-adjusted meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 15 4: 338-347. doi:10.1111/obr.12132


Author Mamun, A. A.
Mannan, M
Doi, S. A. R.
Title Gestational weight gain in relation to offspring obesity over the life course: a systematic review and bias-adjusted meta-analysis
Journal name Obesity Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1467-7881
1467-789X
Publication date 2014-04-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/obr.12132
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 338
End page 347
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Gestational weight gain (GWG) is considered one of the risk factors for future obesity in the offspring. However, the direction and strength of this association at different periods of offspring life is relatively unknown. This study investigates whether excess or inadequate maternal GWG during pregnancy influences the risk of offspring obesity at different stages in life. A systematic review of published articles was undertaken after a comprehensive search of different databases, and extracted data were meta-analysed. To quantify offspring obesity estimates in relation to GWG, we stratified obesity estimates within three life stages of the offspring age: <5 years, 5 to <18 years and 18+ years. Our meta-analysis showed that, compared with offspring of women with adequate GWG, offspring of women who gained inadequate gestational weight were at a decreased risk of obesity (relative risk [RR]: 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–0.94), and offspring of women who gained excess weight were at an increased risk of obesity (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.23–1.59). These relationships were similar after stratification by life stage. Findings of this study therefore suggest that excess GWG does influence offspring obesity over the short- and long-term, and should therefore be avoided.
Keyword Body mass index
Gestational weight gain
Obesity
Offspring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 9 DEC 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Mar 2014, 22:08:48 EST by Nyree Divitini on behalf of School of Public Health