Do family members interfere in the delivery of care when present during invasive paediatric procedures in the emergency department?

Ryan, Glenn and Treston, Greg (2007) Do family members interfere in the delivery of care when present during invasive paediatric procedures in the emergency department?. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 19 3: 234-240. doi:10.1111/j.1742-6723.2007.00962.x


Author Ryan, Glenn
Treston, Greg
Title Do family members interfere in the delivery of care when present during invasive paediatric procedures in the emergency department?
Journal name Emergency Medicine Australasia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-6731
1742-6723
Publication date 2007-07-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-6723.2007.00962.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Issue 3
Start page 234
End page 240
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Abstract Objective: To determine whether family members interfere with patient care when present during invasive procedures performed on their children in the ED.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine whether family members interfere with patient care when present during invasive procedures performed on their children in the ED.

Methods: A prospective observational study of consecutive cases of procedural sedation of children aged between 12 months and 16 years was conducted between March 2002 and March 2006 in the ED of a secondary-level regional hospital in south-east Queensland. Procedures performed included laceration repair, fracture reduction, foreign body removal and abscess incision and drainage. Parents/primary caregivers were encouraged to stay with their child. A stepwise explanation of the procedure and sedation to be used was undertaken, informed consent obtained and telephone follow up attempted 5-14 days post procedure.

Results: Six hundred and fifty-two patient encounters with parents or primary caregivers present for the procedure were included for a total of 656 procedures: 234 laceration repairs, 250 fracture reductions, 85 foreign body removals, 33 abscess incision and drainages, 14 dislocation reductions and 40 other procedures. Telephone follow up was successful in 65% (424) of cases. The mean age was 6.5 years. Family member interference occurred in one case (0.15%, 95% confidence interval 0-0.73%). In 17 cases (2.68%, 95% confidence interval 2.1-5.9%) family members present expressed concerns about the procedure during the telephone follow up but had not interfered at the time of the procedure. There were no significant differences between the concerned parents at follow up and the study group across key patient variables such as child's age (P = 0.369), weight (P = 0.379), respiratory rate (P = 0.477), sex (P = 0.308), procedure indication (P = 0.308) and airway manoeuvres (P = 0.153).

Conclusion: When family members are encouraged to stay for invasive procedures performed on their child, and careful explanation of the procedure, sedation, possible complications, choice of medication for sedation and possible side-effects is undertaken, family member interference is extremely rare.
Keyword Children
Family
Interfere
Invasive procedure
Paediatric
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Mater Health Services Publications
 
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