Microbes, the gut and ankylosing spondylitis

Costello, Mary-Ellen, Elewaut, Dirk, Kenna, Tony J. and Brown, Matthew A. (2013) Microbes, the gut and ankylosing spondylitis. Arthritis Research and Therapy, 15 3: 214.1-214.10. doi:10.1186/ar4228

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Author Costello, Mary-Ellen
Elewaut, Dirk
Kenna, Tony J.
Brown, Matthew A.
Title Microbes, the gut and ankylosing spondylitis
Journal name Arthritis Research and Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1478-6354
1478-6362
Publication date 2013-06-06
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/ar4228
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 15
Issue 3
Start page 214.1
End page 214.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Abstract It is increasingly clear that the interaction between host and microbiome profoundly affects health. There are 10 times more bacteria in and on our bodies than the total of our own cells, and the human intestine contains approximately 100 trillion bacteria. Interrogation of microbial communities by using classic microbiology techniques offers a very restricted view of these communities, allowing us to see only what we can grow in isolation. However, recent advances in sequencing technologies have greatly facilitated systematic and comprehensive studies of the role of the microbiome in human health and disease. Comprehensive understanding of our microbiome will enhance understanding of disease pathogenesis, which in turn may lead to rationally targeted therapy for a number of conditions, including autoimmunity.
Formatted abstract
It is increasingly clear that the interaction between host and microbiome profoundly affects health. There are 10 times more bacteria in and on our bodies than the total of our own cells, and the human intestine contains approximately 100 trillion bacteria. Interrogation of microbial communities by using classic microbiology techniques offers a very restricted view of these communities, allowing us to see only what we can grow in isolation. However, recent advances in sequencing technologies have greatly facilitated systematic and comprehensive studies of the role of the microbiome in human health and disease. Comprehensive understanding of our microbiome will enhance understanding of disease pathogenesis, which in turn may lead to rationally targeted therapy for a number of conditions, including autoimmunity.
Keyword Rheumatology
Rheumatology
RHEUMATOLOGY
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID APP1024879
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
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UQ Diamantina Institute - Open Access Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 23 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 20 Mar 2014, 22:25:02 EST by Kylie Hengst on behalf of UQ Diamantina Institute