Impacts of trace carbon on the microstructure of as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo alloy and reassessment of the maximum carbon limit

Yan, M., Qian, M., Kong, C. and Dargusch, M. S. (2014) Impacts of trace carbon on the microstructure of as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo alloy and reassessment of the maximum carbon limit. Acta Biomaterialia, 10 2: 1014-1023. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2013.10.034


Author Yan, M.
Qian, M.
Kong, C.
Dargusch, M. S.
Title Impacts of trace carbon on the microstructure of as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo alloy and reassessment of the maximum carbon limit
Journal name Acta Biomaterialia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-7061
1878-7568
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.actbio.2013.10.034
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 10
Issue 2
Start page 1014
End page 1023
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 1305 Biotechnology
1303 Biochemistry
2502 Biomaterials
2204 Biomedical Engineering
1312 Molecular Biology
Abstract The formation of grain boundary (GB) brittle carbides with a complex three-dimensional (3-D) morphology can be detrimental to both the fatigue properties and corrosion resistance of a biomedical titanium alloy. A detailed microscopic study has been performed on an as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo (in wt.%) alloy containing 0.032 wt.% C. A noticeable presence of a carbon-enriched phase has been observed along the GB, although the carbon content is well below the maximum carbon limit of 0.1 wt.% specified by ASTM Standard F2066. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified that the carbon-enriched phase is face-centred cubic Ti2C. 3-D tomography reconstruction revealed that the Ti2C structure has morphology similar to primary alpha-Ti. Nanoindentation confirmed the high hardness and high Young's modulus of the GB Ti2C phase. To avoid GB carbide formation in Ti-15Mo, the carbon content should be limited to 0.006 wt.% by Thermo-Calc predictions. Similar analyses and characterization of the carbide formation in biomedical unalloyed Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-16Nb have also been performed. (C) 2013 Acts Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
The formation of grain boundary (GB) brittle carbides with a complex three-dimensional (3-D) morphology can be detrimental to both the fatigue properties and corrosion resistance of a biomedical titanium alloy. A detailed microscopic study has been performed on an as-sintered biomedical Ti–15Mo (in wt.%) alloy containing 0.032 wt.% C. A noticeable presence of a carbon-enriched phase has been observed along the GB, although the carbon content is well below the maximum carbon limit of 0.1 wt.% specified by ASTM Standard F2066. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified that the carbon-enriched phase is face-centred cubic Ti2C. 3-D tomography reconstruction revealed that the Ti2C structure has morphology similar to primary α-Ti. Nanoindentation confirmed the high hardness and high Young’s modulus of the GB Ti2C phase. To avoid GB carbide formation in Ti–15Mo, the carbon content should be limited to 0.006 wt.% by Thermo-Calc predictions. Similar analyses and characterization of the carbide formation in biomedical unalloyed Ti, Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–16Nb have also been performed.
Keyword Biomedical titanium alloys
Carbon limit
Titanium carbides
3-D tomography
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 4 November 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mechanical & Mining Engineering Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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