Internal migration data around the world: assessing contemporary practice

Bell, Martin, Charles-Edwards, Elin, Kupiszewska, Dorota, Kupiszewski, Marek, Stillwell, John and Zhu, Yu (2014) Internal migration data around the world: assessing contemporary practice. Population, Space and Place, 21 1: 1-17. doi:10.1002/psp.1848

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Author Bell, Martin
Charles-Edwards, Elin
Kupiszewska, Dorota
Kupiszewski, Marek
Stillwell, John
Zhu, Yu
Title Internal migration data around the world: assessing contemporary practice
Journal name Population, Space and Place   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1544-8452
1544-8444
Publication date 2014-03-12
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/psp.1848
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Abstract Compared with other demographic processes, little attention has been given to the way levels and patterns of internal migration vary around the world. This can be traced in part to the absence of any central repository of internal migration data, but it also reflects widespread variation in the ways migration is measured. If robust, reliable comparisons between countries are to be made, a clear understanding of the available data is an essential pre-requisite. This paper reports results from the Internal Migration Around the GlobE project, which established an inventory of internal migration data collections for the 193 UN member States, identifying, inter alia, the types of data collected, the intervals over which it is measured and the spatial frameworks employed. Results reveal substantial diversity in data collection practice. We assess the strengths, limitations, and utility of the six principle ways migration is measured and examine their capacity to address key questions and issues in the field. We also identify avenues for harmonisation and conclude with recommendations which aim to facilitate cross-national comparisons. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Formatted abstract
Compared with other demographic processes, little attention has been given to the way levels and patterns of internal migration vary around the world. This can be traced in part to the absence of any central repository of internal migration data, but it also reflects widespread variation in the ways migration is measured. If robust, reliable comparisons between countries are to be made, a clear understanding of the available data is an essential pre-requisite. This paper reports results from the Internal Migration Around the GlobE project, which established an inventory of internal migration data collections for the 193 UN member States, identifying, inter alia, the types of data collected, the intervals over which it is measured and the spatial frameworks employed. Results reveal substantial diversity in data collection practice. We assess the strengths, limitations, and utility of the six principle ways migration is measured and examine their capacity to address key questions and issues in the field. We also identify avenues for harmonisation and conclude with recommendations which aim to facilitate cross-national comparisons.
Keyword Internal migration
Data sources
Cross-national comparisons
Measures
Inventory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 12 MAR 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 13 Mar 2014, 20:14:08 EST by Professor Martin Bell on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management