A randomised clinical trial of a meridian-based intervention for food cravings with six-month follow-up

Stapleton, Peta, Sheldon, Terri, Porter, Brett and Whitty, Jennifer (2011) A randomised clinical trial of a meridian-based intervention for food cravings with six-month follow-up. Behaviour Change, 28 1: 1-16. doi:10.1375/bech.28.1.1


Author Stapleton, Peta
Sheldon, Terri
Porter, Brett
Whitty, Jennifer
Title A randomised clinical trial of a meridian-based intervention for food cravings with six-month follow-up
Journal name Behaviour Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0813-4839
2049-7768
Publication date 2011-05-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1375/bech.28.1.1
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract This randomised, clinical trial tested whether The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) reduced food cravings. This study involved 96 overweight or obese adults who were allocated to the EFT treatment or 4-week waitlist condition. Degree of food craving, perceived power of food, restraint capabilities and psychological symptoms were assessed pre- and post- a 4-week treatment program (mixed method ANOVA comparative analysis), and at 6-month follow-up (repeated measure ANOVA with group data collapsed). EFT was associated with a significantly greater improvement in food cravings, the subjective power of food and craving restraint than waitlist from pre- to immediately post-test (p < .05). Across collapsed groups, an improvement in food cravings and the subjective power of food after active EFT treatment was maintained at 6 months, and a delayed effect was seen for craving restraint. Although there was a significant reduction in measures of psychological distress immediately after treatment (p < .05), there was no between-group difference. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that EFT can have an immediate effect on reducing food cravings and can result in maintaining reduced cravings over time.
Formatted abstract
This randomised, clinical trial tested whether The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) reduced food cravings. This study involved 96 overweight or obese adults who were allocated to the EFT treatment or 4-week waitlist condition. Degree of food craving, perceived power of food, restraint capabilities and psychological symptoms were assessed pre- and post- a 4-week treatment program (mixed method ANOVA comparative analysis), and at 6-month follow-up (repeated measure ANOVA with group data collapsed). EFT was associated with a significantly greater improvement in food cravings, the subjective power of food and craving restraint than waitlist from pre- to immediately post-test (p < .05). Across collapsed groups, an improvement in food cravings and the subjective power of food after active EFT treatment was maintained at 6 months, and a delayed effect was seen for craving restraint. Although there was a significant reduction in measures of psychological distress immediately after treatment (p < .05), there was no between-group difference. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that EFT can have an immediate effect on reducing food cravings and can result in maintaining reduced cravings over time.
Keyword Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT)
Food cravings
Weight
Energy psychology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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