Effective cancer cell killing by hydrophobic nanovoid-enhanced cavitation under safe low-energy ultrasound

Zhao, Yang, Zhu, Yingchun, Fu, Jingke and Wang, Lianzhou (2014) Effective cancer cell killing by hydrophobic nanovoid-enhanced cavitation under safe low-energy ultrasound. Chemistry - An Asian Journal, 9 3: 790-796. doi:10.1002/asia.201301333


Author Zhao, Yang
Zhu, Yingchun
Fu, Jingke
Wang, Lianzhou
Title Effective cancer cell killing by hydrophobic nanovoid-enhanced cavitation under safe low-energy ultrasound
Journal name Chemistry - An Asian Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1861-4728
1861-471X
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/asia.201301333
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page 790
End page 796
Total pages 7
Place of publication Weinheim, Germany
Publisher Wiley - V C H
Language eng
Abstract β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD)-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids were prepared and used for effective cancer cell killing in synergistic combination with low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm-2, 1 MHz). The water-dispersible nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids can be taken up by cancer cells and subsequently evoke a remarkable cavitation effect under irradiation with mild low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm-2, 1 MHz). A significant cancer cell killing effect was observed in cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft tumor model treated with the nanoagents together with the low-energy ultrasound, showing a distinct dependence on the concentration of nanoagents and ultrasound intensity. By contrast, an antitumor effect was not observed when either low-energy ultrasound or nanoagents were applied alone. These findings are significant as the technique promises a safe, low-cost, and effective treatment for cancer therapy. Seeds of success: After accumulation in tumors and endocytosis to lysosomes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles with internal hydrophobic mesopores can act as bubble nucleation seeds responding to low-intensity ultrasound. This drastically amplifies the ultrasonic cavitation effect, a process that can disrupt the lysosomal membrane and release lysosomal proteases, thus leading to cell necrosis. Copyright
Keyword Cancer
Cavitation
Low-energy ultrasound
Mesoporous materials
Nanoparticles
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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