Age-dependent decline of association between obesity and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Wang, Zhiqiang (2015) Age-dependent decline of association between obesity and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 9 1: 1-11. doi:10.1016/j.orcp.2014.01.006

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Author Wang, Zhiqiang
Title Age-dependent decline of association between obesity and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal name Obesity Research and Clinical Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1871-403X
1878-0318
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.01.006
Volume 9
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective It is debatable if the strength of obesity–mortality association depends on age. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of age on the obesity–mortality association in men and women, and to assess if adjusting for major confounding factors altered the age-dependent trend of the obesity–mortality association.

Design and methods Articles were identified by searches of PubMed through 15 August 2013. Twenty studies which reported two or more age-specific effect estimates were identified. A random-effect approach was applied to estimate pooled effect sizes for different age groups.

Results There was a significant heterogeneity among studies within each age group in the effect estimates for the association between obesity and mortality. The pooled hazard ratio estimates decreased with increasing age from 1.59 (95% confidence interval, 1.46–1.72) for men and 1.60 (1.49–1.72) for women under 35 years to 1.11 (1.08–1.15) for men and 1.11 (1.09–1.14) for women 75 years or older. On average, the effect estimate was decreased by about 10% with every 10 years increase in age.

Conclusions Adjusting for known confounding factors of smoking, pre-existing illness, hypertension and diabetes has little impact on the age-dependent decline trend of the obesity–mortality association. Therefore, the strength of the association between obesity and mortality weakens with increasing age.
Keyword Obesity
Mortality
Confounding
Age dependent
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 6 March 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 07 Mar 2014, 05:59:49 EST by Zhiqiang Wang on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital