Taming the adolescent mind: a randomised controlled trial examining clinical efficacy of an adolescent mindfulness-based group programme

Tan, Lucy and Martin, Graham (2014) Taming the adolescent mind: a randomised controlled trial examining clinical efficacy of an adolescent mindfulness-based group programme. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 20 1: 49-55. doi:10.1111/camh.12057

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Author Tan, Lucy
Martin, Graham
Title Taming the adolescent mind: a randomised controlled trial examining clinical efficacy of an adolescent mindfulness-based group programme
Journal name Child and Adolescent Mental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-357X
1475-3588
Publication date 2014-02-28
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/camh.12057
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 20
Issue 1
Start page 49
End page 55
Total pages 7
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Mindfulness interventions with adolescents are in the early stages of development. This study sought to establish efficacy of a mindfulness-based group intervention for adolescents with mixed mental health disorders.

Method One hundred and eight adolescents (ages 13–18) were recruited from community mental health clinics and randomised into two groups (control vs. treatment). All participants received treatment-as-usual (TAU) from clinic-based therapists independent of the study. Adolescents in the treatment condition received TAU plus a 5-week mindfulness-training programme (TAU+Mi); adolescents in the control group received only TAU. Assessments including parent/carer reports were conducted at baseline, postintervention and 3-month follow-up.

Results At postintervention, adolescents in the mindfulness condition experienced significant decrease in mental distress (measured with the DASS-21) compared to the control group (Cohen's d = 0.43), and these gains were enhanced at 3-month follow-up (Cohen's d = 0.78). Overall outcomes at 3 months showed significant improvement for adolescents in the mindfulness condition; in self-esteem, mindfulness, psychological inflexibility and mental health, but not resilience. Parents/carers also reported significant improvement in their adolescent's psychological functioning (using the CBCL). Mediation analyses concluded mindfulness mediated mental health outcomes.

Conclusions Increase in mindful awareness after training leads to improvement in mental health and this is consistent with mindfulness theory. The mindfulness group programme appears to be a promising adjunctive therapeutic approach for clinic-based adolescents with mental health problems.

Key Practitioner Message
• Taming the Adolescent Mind’ – mindfulness-based programme is efficacious adjunctive treatment
• Mindfulness mediates mental health outcomes in this study
• The young people in this study improved in mental health
• Improvements were sustained postintervention and up to 3 months
Keyword Mindfulness
Children
Adolescents
Psychological flexibility
Mediation
Clinical efficacy
RCT design
Mental health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 05 Mar 2014, 22:11:49 EST by Ms Kate Rowe on behalf of School of Medicine