Are root exudates more important than other sources of rhizodeposits in structuring rhizosphere bacterial communities?

Dennis P.G., Miller A.J. and Hirsch P.R. (2010) Are root exudates more important than other sources of rhizodeposits in structuring rhizosphere bacterial communities?. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 72 3: 313-327. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.00860.x


Author Dennis P.G.
Miller A.J.
Hirsch P.R.
Title Are root exudates more important than other sources of rhizodeposits in structuring rhizosphere bacterial communities?
Journal name FEMS Microbiology Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-6496
1574-6941
Publication date 2010-01-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.00860.x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 72
Issue 3
Start page 313
End page 327
Total pages 15
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Language eng
Subject 2303 Ecology
2402 Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
2404 Microbiology
Abstract This review evaluates the importance of root exudates in determining rhizosphere bacterial community structure. We present evidence that indicates that: (1) the direct influence of root exudates on rhizosphere bacterial communities is limited to small spatiotemporal windows related to root apices; (2) upon rapid assimilation by microorganisms, root exudates are modified, independent of plant influences, before rerelease into the rhizosphere by the microorganisms themselves - thus, at short distances from root apices, rhizosphere carbon pools are unlikely to be dominated by root exudates; and (3) many of the major compounds found in root exudates are ubiquitous in the rhizosphere as they are found in other pools of rhizodeposits and in microbial exudates. Following this argument, we suggest that the importance of root exudates in structuring rhizosphere bacterial communities needs to be considered in the context of the wider contribution of other rhizosphere carbon pools. Finally, we discuss the implications of rhizosphere bacterial distribution trends for the development of effective strategies to manage beneficial plant-microorganism interactions.
Keyword Microbial ecology
Rhizodeposition
Rhizosphere
Root exudation
Soil
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Wed, 05 Mar 2014, 01:54:25 EST by Paul Dennis on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences