Prospective evaluation of parent distress following pediatric burns and identification of risk factors for young child and parent posttraumatic stress disorder

De Young, Alexandra C., Hendrikz, Joan, Kenardy, Justin A., Cobham, Vanessa E. and Kimble, Roy M. (2014) Prospective evaluation of parent distress following pediatric burns and identification of risk factors for young child and parent posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 24 1: 9-17. doi:10.1089/cap.2013.0066


Author De Young, Alexandra C.
Hendrikz, Joan
Kenardy, Justin A.
Cobham, Vanessa E.
Kimble, Roy M.
Title Prospective evaluation of parent distress following pediatric burns and identification of risk factors for young child and parent posttraumatic stress disorder
Journal name Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1044-5463
1557-8992
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/cap.2013.0066
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 24
Issue 1
Start page 9
End page 17
Total pages 9
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers
Language eng
Subject 2736 Pharmacology (medical)
2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: Early childhood is a high-risk time for exposure to potentially traumatic medical events. We have previously reported that 10% of young children continue to have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months after burn injury. This study aimed to 1) document the prevalence and prospective change in parental psychological distress over 6 months following their child's burn injury and 2) identify risk factors for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in young children and their parents. Methods: Participants were 120 parents of 1-6-year-old children with unintentional burn injuries. Data were collected within 2 weeks, 1 month, and 6 months of burn injury using developmentally sensitive diagnostic interviews and questionnaires. Results: Within the first month, ∼25% of parents had a probable PTSD diagnosis, and moderate to extremely severe levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Distress levels decreased significantly over time; however, 5% of parents still had probable PTSD at 6 months. Hierarchical multiple regression and path analyses indicated that parent posttraumatic stress reactions contributed significantly to the development and maintenance of child PTSS. Other risk factors for child PTSS included premorbid emotional and behavioral difficulties and larger burn size. Risk factors identified for parent PTSS included prior trauma history, acute distress, greater number of child invasive procedures, guilt, and child PTSS. Conclusions: The findings from this study suggest that parents' responses to a traumatic event may play a particularly important role in a young child's psychological recovery. However, further research is needed to confirm the direction of the relationship between child and parent distress. This study identified variables that could be incorporated into screening tools or targeted by early intervention protocols to prevent the development of persistent child and parent PTSS following medical trauma.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 04 Mar 2014, 10:53:11 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology