Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives

Lee, Anthony J., Mitchem, Dorian G., Wright, Margaret J., Martin, Nicholas G., Keller, Matthew C. and Zietsch, Brendan P. (2014) Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives. Psychological Science, 25 2: 476-484. doi:10.1177/0956797613510724


Author Lee, Anthony J.
Mitchem, Dorian G.
Wright, Margaret J.
Martin, Nicholas G.
Keller, Matthew C.
Zietsch, Brendan P.
Title Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives
Journal name Psychological Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0956-7976
1467-9280
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0956797613510724
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 25
Issue 2
Start page 476
End page 484
Total pages 9
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Abstract For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.
Keyword Evolution
Good genes
Immunocompetence-handicap principle
Intralocus sexual conflict
Pathogen
Sexual dimorphism
Sexually antagonistic selection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID R01 MH100141
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print: 30 December 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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