Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults

Stieglitz Ham, Heidi, Bunn, Paul, Meyer, Carly, Khan, Asad and Hickson, Louise (2014) Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults. International Journal of Audiology, 53 S1: S38-S42. doi:10.3109/14992027.2013.847287


Author Stieglitz Ham, Heidi
Bunn, Paul
Meyer, Carly
Khan, Asad
Hickson, Louise
Title Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults
Journal name International Journal of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1499-2027
1708-8186
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/14992027.2013.847287
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 53
Issue S1
Start page S38
End page S42
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject 3616 Speech and Hearing
1203 Design Practice and Management
3310 Linguistics and Language
Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to explore technology use and its relationship to help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) and success with hearing aids among older adults. Previous research had suggested a link between higher levels of technology use and hearing aid success. Design: General technology use was evaluated using a purposefully developed 25-item questionnaire. Twelve items related to everyday technology use (e.g. DVD player) and 13 related to advanced technology use (e.g. Bluetooth). Study sample: Four groups of older adults with HI participated in the study: (1) non-consulters (n = 49), (2) consulters (n = 62), (3) unsuccessful hearing aid owners (n = 61), and (4) successful hearing aid owners (n = 79). Results: Preliminary analyses revealed a main effect in the use of everyday and advanced technology across the four participant groups. However, it was found that age and living arrangements accounted for most of the variance in reported everyday technology use (p = .030; p = .029, respectively) and age and gender accounted for the variance in reported advanced technology use (p <.001; p = .040, respectively). For everyday technology, an increase in age and living alone were associated with decreased technology use and for advanced technology use, age and female gender were associated with decreased technology use. Conclusions: Although we hypothesized that technology use would be less amongst non-consulters and unsuccessful hearing aid owners, our findings did not support this prediction. Technology use did not vary by group membership once the covariates of age, gender, and living arrangements were accounted for.
Keyword Hearing aids
Hearing impairment
Help Seeking
Older adults
Outcomes
Technology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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