Identifying the barriers and facilitators to optimal hearing aid self-efficacy

Meyer, Carly, Hickson, Louise and Fletcher, Amanda (2014) Identifying the barriers and facilitators to optimal hearing aid self-efficacy. International Journal of Audiology, 53 S1: S28-S37. doi:10.3109/14992027.2013.832420


Author Meyer, Carly
Hickson, Louise
Fletcher, Amanda
Title Identifying the barriers and facilitators to optimal hearing aid self-efficacy
Journal name International Journal of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1499-2027
1708-8186
Publication date 2014-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/14992027.2013.832420
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 53
Issue S1
Start page S28
End page S37
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject 3616 Speech and Hearing
1203 Design Practice and Management
3310 Linguistics and Language
Abstract Objective: Many older adults with hearing impairment are not confident in their ability to use hearing aids (i.e. experience low hearing aid self-efficacy), which has been found to be a barrier to hearing help-seeking and hearing aid use. This study aimed to determine what factors were associated with achieving adequate hearing aid self-efficacy. Design: A retrospective research design was employed wherein hearing aid self-efficacy was the primary outcome. Explanatory variables included personal demographics, visual disability, and experiences related to participants' hearing ability and hearing aids. Study sample: A total of 307 older adults with hearing impairment participated in the study (147 non hearing aid owners and 160 hearing aid owners). Results: Non-hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they reported no visual disability, had experienced hearing loss for longer, reported more positive support from a significant other, and were not anxious about wearing hearing aids. Hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they had had a positive hearing aid experience and no visual disability. Conclusions: More research is needed to develop and evaluate intervention approaches that promote optimal levels of hearing aid self-efficacy among older adults with hearing impairment.
Keyword Hearing aids
Older adults
Self efficacy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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