An Australian version of the acceptable noise level test and its predictive value for successful hearing aid use in an older population

Walravens, Els, Keidser, Gitte, Hartley, David and Hickson, Louise (2014) An Australian version of the acceptable noise level test and its predictive value for successful hearing aid use in an older population. International Journal of Audiology, 53 S1: S52-S59. doi:10.3109/14992027.2013.862599


Author Walravens, Els
Keidser, Gitte
Hartley, David
Hickson, Louise
Title An Australian version of the acceptable noise level test and its predictive value for successful hearing aid use in an older population
Journal name International Journal of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1499-2027
1708-8186
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/14992027.2013.862599
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 53
Issue S1
Start page S52
End page S59
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject 3616 Speech and Hearing
1203 Design Practice and Management
3310 Linguistics and Language
Abstract Objective: The acceptable noise level (ANL), a measure of noise tolerance, has been proposed as a predictor for successful hearing aid use. The aims of this study were to obtain normative data, and to evaluate the clinical feasibility and predictive value of an Australian version of the ANL test in an older population. Design: Repeated ANL measurements were presented diotically using earphones. All participants provided demographic information and hearing aid owners were asked about their aid use. Study sample: A total of 290 older adults were assessed; 166 participants had a hearing impairment and 96 owned a hearing aid. Results: The mean ANL was lower than previously reported. While age and gender had no effect on ANL, a significant, but weak, correlation was found between ANL and hearing loss. The test-retest reliability showed the results were clinically unreliable. In addition, the ANL did not predict hours or pattern of hearing aid use. Conclusions: While the Australian ANL test showed several similar characteristics to previous versions of the test, low test-retest reliability raised questions about its clinical value as a predictor for long-term hearing aid use.
Keyword Acceptable noise level
Hearing aid use
Hearing aids
Hearing impaired
Older adults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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