An Unusual Presentation of Probable Dementia: Rhyming, Associations and Verbal Disinhibition

Robinson, Gail and Ceslis, Amelia (2014) An Unusual Presentation of Probable Dementia: Rhyming, Associations and Verbal Disinhibition. Journal of Neuropsychology, 8 2: 289-294. doi:10.1111/jnp.12041


Author Robinson, Gail
Ceslis, Amelia
Title An Unusual Presentation of Probable Dementia: Rhyming, Associations and Verbal Disinhibition
Journal name Journal of Neuropsychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1748-6645
1748-6653
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jnp.12041
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 8
Issue 2
Start page 289
End page 294
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley and Sons Ltd.
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 We report a case of probable Alzheimer's disease who presented with the unusual feature of disinhibited rhyming. Core language skills were largely intact but generative language was characterized by semantic-based associations, evident in tangential and associative content, and phonology-based associations, evident in rhyming, in the context of prominent executive dysfunction. We suggest this pattern is underpinned by a failure to terminate or inhibit verbal associations resulting in a 'loosening' of associations at the level of conceptual preparation for spoken language.
Keyword Verbal generation
Dementia
Disinhibition
Conceptual preparation
Spoken output
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DE1211119
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Feb 2014, 23:28:18 EST by Gail Robinson on behalf of School of Psychology