Animal models of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia

Gotz, Jurgen and Ittner, Lars M. (2008) Animal models of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 9 7: 532-544. doi:10.1038/nrn2420


Author Gotz, Jurgen
Ittner, Lars M.
Title Animal models of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia
Journal name Nature Reviews Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-003X
1471-0048
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1038/nrn2420
Volume 9
Issue 7
Start page 532
End page 544
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1307 Cell Biology
2800 Neuroscience
Abstract Insoluble protein aggregates have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent work in transgenic mice has shed light on the role of these aggregates by identifying soluble oligomeric species that may interfere with essential cellular mechanisms at an early disease stage. This review summarizes what we have learned about the roles of these proteins from transgenic mice and invertebrate species such as flies and worms. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of tissue from these animal models have identified new molecules with crucial roles in disease. Moreover, transgenic animals have been instrumental in defining drug targets and designing novel therapeutic strategies. With advanced imaging techniques that can be used in both humans and mice an early, preclinical diagnosis of AD and FTD could be within reach.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 354 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 400 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 26 Feb 2014, 18:28:42 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute