Control order and visuomotor strategy development for joystick-steered underground shuttle cars

Cloete, Steven, Zupanc, Christine, Burgess-Limerick, Robin and Wallis, Guy (2014) Control order and visuomotor strategy development for joystick-steered underground shuttle cars. Human Factors, 56 6: 1177-1188. doi:10.1177/0018720814522295

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Author Cloete, Steven
Zupanc, Christine
Burgess-Limerick, Robin
Wallis, Guy
Title Control order and visuomotor strategy development for joystick-steered underground shuttle cars
Journal name Human Factors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-7208
1547-8181
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0018720814522295
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 56
Issue 6
Start page 1177
End page 1188
Total pages 12
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
3202 Applied Psychology
2802 Behavioral Neuroscience
Abstract Objective: In this simulator-based study, we aimed to quantify performance differences between joystick steering systems using first-order and second-order control, which are used in underground coal mining shuttle cars. In addition, we conducted an exploratory analysis of how users of the more difficult, second-order system changed their behavior over time.
Formatted abstract
Objective: In this simulator-based study, we aimed to quantify performance differences between joystick steering systems using first-order and second-order control, which are used in underground coal mining shuttle cars. In addition, we conducted an exploratory analysis of how users of the more difficult, second-order system changed their behavior over time.

Background: Evidence from the visuomotor control literature suggests that higher-order control devices are not intuitive, which could pose a significant risk to underground mine personnel, equipment, and infrastructure.

Method: Thirty-six naive participants were randomly assigned to first- and second-order conditions and completed three experimental trials comprising sequences of 90° turns in a virtual underground mine environment, with velocity held constant at 9 km/h−1. Performance measures were lateral deviation, steering angle variability, high-frequency steering content, joystick activity, and cumulative time in collision with the virtual mine wall.

Results: The second-order control group exhibited significantly poorer performance for all outcome measures. In addition, a series of correlation analyses revealed that changes in strategy were evident in the second-order group but not the first-order group.

Conclusion: Results were consistent with previous literature indicating poorer performance with higher-order control devices and caution against the adoption of the second-order joystick system for underground shuttle cars.

Application: Low-cost, portable simulation platforms may provide an effective basis for operator training and recruitment.
Keyword Steering
Visuomotor control
Vehicles
Mining
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print February 14, 2014.

 
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Created: Mon, 24 Feb 2014, 23:11:39 EST by Dr Robin Burgess-limerick on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre