Feeling connected again: interventions that increase social identification reduce depression symptoms in community and clinical settings

Cruwys, Tegan, Haslam, S. Alexander, Dingle, Genevieve A., Jetten, Jolanda, Hornsey, Matthew J., Chong, E. M. Desdemona and Oei, Tian P. S. (2014) Feeling connected again: interventions that increase social identification reduce depression symptoms in community and clinical settings. Journal of Affective Disorders, 159 139-146. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2014.02.019

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ323862OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 596.00KB 0

Author Cruwys, Tegan
Haslam, S. Alexander
Dingle, Genevieve A.
Jetten, Jolanda
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Chong, E. M. Desdemona
Oei, Tian P. S.
Title Feeling connected again: interventions that increase social identification reduce depression symptoms in community and clinical settings
Journal name Journal of Affective Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-0327
1573-2517
Publication date 2014-02-18
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.02.019
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 159
Start page 139
End page 146
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Background: Clinical depression is often preceded by social withdrawal, however, limited research has examined whether depressive symptoms are alleviated by interventions that increase social contact. In particular, no research has investigated whether social identification (the sense of being part of a group) moderates the impact of social interventions.
Formatted abstract
Background Clinical depression is often preceded by social withdrawal, however, limited research has examined whether depressive symptoms are alleviated by interventions that increase social contact. In particular, no research has investigated whether social identification (the sense of being part of a group) moderates the impact of social interventions.

Method We test this in two longitudinal intervention studies. In Study 1 (N=52), participants at risk of depression joined a community recreation group; in Study 2 (N=92) adults with diagnosed depression joined a clinical psychotherapy group.

Results In both studies, social identification predicted recovery from depression after controlling for initial depression severity, frequency of attendance, and group type. In Study 2, benefits of social identification were larger for depression symptoms than for anxiety symptoms or quality of life.

Limitation Social identification is subjective and psychological, and therefore participants could not be randomly assigned to high and low social identification conditions.

Conclusions Findings have implications for health practitioners in clinical and community settings, suggesting that facilitating social participation is effective and cost-effective in treating depression.
Keyword Depression
Social identification
Loneliness
Group psychotherapy
Relapse prevention
Mental health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID FL110100199
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 18 February 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 39 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 41 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 24 Feb 2014, 20:00:28 EST by Tegan Cruwys on behalf of School of Psychology