Blind prescribing: A study of junior doctors' prescribing preparedness in an Australian emergency department

Starmer, K., Sinnott, M., Shaban, R., Donegan, E. and Kapitzke, D. (2013) Blind prescribing: A study of junior doctors' prescribing preparedness in an Australian emergency department. EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 25 2: 147-153. doi:10.1111/1742-6723.12061

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Starmer, K.
Sinnott, M.
Shaban, R.
Donegan, E.
Kapitzke, D.
Title Blind prescribing: A study of junior doctors' prescribing preparedness in an Australian emergency department
Journal name EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-6731
1742-6723
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12061
Volume 25
Issue 2
Start page 147
End page 153
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject 2711 Emergency Medicine
Abstract Objectives: The present study examined junior residents' and registrars' preparedness to prescribe in an Australian ED. It measured the medication knowledge of participants and identified antecedent factors relevant to prescribing practice. Methods: This is a prospective, exploratory study of the prescribing practices of 40 junior doctors. Data collection consisted of a participant questionnaire with three parts. Part A comprised demographic information; Part B comprised questions regarding prescribing practices; and Part C was an objective assessment of the doctor's knowledge of the most recently and most commonly prescribed medications. Results: One hundred percent (n = 40) of doctors in the study had inadequate knowledge about at least one medication when an accuracy threshold of <80% correct was used. Seventy percent (n = 28) of the participants had inadequate knowledge of at least one medication when the lower accuracy threshold of <50% correct was used. Comparisons between medication knowledge score and Likert confidence scales showed that even though a doctor reported being completely sure about an individual medication, they most commonly only answered between four and six of the eight questions correctly for that medication. Their use of reference materials was also lacking in relation to their knowledge and level of confidence. The reported reasons for this included instructions by senior staff and time constraints. Conclusions: The majority of participants in the study had inadequate knowledge on medications they had most recently prescribed and medications most commonly prescribed in the ED. Junior doctors' perceptions of their medication knowledge were inflated in relation to their actual knowledge. © 2013 The Authors EMA
Keyword Blind prescribing
Doctor
Emergency medicine
Medication safety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 22 Feb 2014, 23:20:02 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine