A functional MRI study of the relationship between naming treatment outcomes and resting state functional connectivity in post-stroke aphasia

van Hees, Sophia, McMahon, Katie, Angwin, Anthony, de Zubicaray, Greig, Read, Stephen and Copland, David A. (2014) A functional MRI study of the relationship between naming treatment outcomes and resting state functional connectivity in post-stroke aphasia. Human Brain Mapping, 35 8: 3919-3931. doi:10.1002/hbm.22448

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Author van Hees, Sophia
McMahon, Katie
Angwin, Anthony
de Zubicaray, Greig
Read, Stephen
Copland, David A.
Title A functional MRI study of the relationship between naming treatment outcomes and resting state functional connectivity in post-stroke aphasia
Journal name Human Brain Mapping   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1065-9471
1097-0193
Publication date 2014-08-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/hbm.22448
Volume 35
Issue 8
Start page 3919
End page 3931
Total pages 13
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Jossey Bass
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background The majority of studies investigating the neural mechanisms underlying treatment in people with aphasia have examined task-based brain activity. However, the use of resting-state fMRI may provide another method of examining the brain mechanisms responsible for treatment-induced recovery, and allows for investigation into connectivity within complex functional networks

Methods Eight people with aphasia underwent 12 treatment sessions that aimed to improve object naming. Half the sessions employed a phonologically-based task, and half the sessions employed a semantic-based task, with resting-state fMRI conducted pre- and post-treatment. Brain regions in which the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) correlated with treatment outcomes were used as seeds for functional connectivity (FC) analysis. FC maps were compared from pre- to post-treatment, as well as with a group of 12 healthy older controls

Results Pre-treatment ALFF in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) correlated with greater outcomes for the phonological treatment, with a shift to the left MTG and supramarginal gyrus, as well as the right inferior frontal gyrus, post-treatment. When compared to controls, participants with aphasia showed both normalization and up-regulation of connectivity within language networks post-treatment, predominantly in the left hemisphere

Conclusions The results provide preliminary evidence that treatments for naming impairments affect the FC of language networks, and may aid in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the rehabilitation of language post-stroke.
Keyword Anomia
Rehabilitation
Phonology
Semantics
Language network
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 22 JAN 2014

 
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Created: Wed, 19 Feb 2014, 04:36:50 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research