Instructions and Artworks: Musical Scores, Theatrical Scripts, Architectural Plans, and Screenplays.

Nannicelli, Ted (2011) Instructions and Artworks: Musical Scores, Theatrical Scripts, Architectural Plans, and Screenplays.. British Journal of Aesthetics, 51 4: 399-414. doi:10.1093/aesthj/ayr029

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Author Nannicelli, Ted
Title Instructions and Artworks: Musical Scores, Theatrical Scripts, Architectural Plans, and Screenplays.
Journal name British Journal of Aesthetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-0904
1468-2842
Publication date 2011-09-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/aesthj/ayr029
Volume 51
Issue 4
Start page 399
End page 414
Total pages 15
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This essay offers an account of the relationship between screenplay and film, and it does so by comparing this relationship to the relationships that hold between other sets of instructions and artworks: score and musical work, theatrical script and theatrical work, architectural plan and architectural work. I argue that musical scores and theatrical scripts are work-determinative documents-manuscripts whose existence entails the existence of musical works and theatrical works, respectively, and which determine the facts about what those works are like. On the contrary, I argue that architectural plans and screenplays are not work-determinative because they alone do not entail the existence of any architectural work or film. Nevertheless, I conclude that wthis difference has no bearing upon art status: theatrical scripts are almost always artworks in their own right, musical scores almost never are, and architectural plans are in certain cases. This conclusion suggests that although the relationship between theatrical script and theatrical work is quite different from that between screenplay and film, there is no reason to think that screenplays cannot be literary artworks in their own right.
Keyword Ontology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 17 Feb 2014, 22:04:58 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts