Moderate comic immoralism and the genetic approach to the ethical criticism of art

Nannicelli, Ted (2014) Moderate comic immoralism and the genetic approach to the ethical criticism of art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 72 2: 169-179. doi:10.1111/jaac.12072


Author Nannicelli, Ted
Title Moderate comic immoralism and the genetic approach to the ethical criticism of art
Journal name Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8529
1540-6245
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jaac.12072
Volume 72
Issue 2
Start page 169
End page 179
Total pages 11
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract According to comic moralism, moral flaws make comic works less funny or not funny at all. In contrast, comic immoralism is the view that moral flaws make comic works funnier. In this article, I argue for a moderate version of comic immoralism. I claim that, sometimes, comic works are funny partly in virtue of their moral flaws. I argue for this claim—and artistic immoralism more generally—by identifying artistically valuable moral flaws in relevant actions undertaken in the creation of those works. Underlying this argument is the idea that such generative actions are partly constitutive of a work's identity, and, therefore, they may affect the ethical value of an artwork either positively or negatively, and they are the proper objects of ethical appraisal.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 17 Feb 2014, 21:56:10 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts